📘 Method postfix operator . in Perl 6

There are a few syntactical elements in Perl 6, which start with a dot. These operators might look like a postfix operator, but they all are the forms of the calling a method on an object. Unlike Perl 5, the dot operator does not do any string concatenation. .method calls a method on a variable. … Continue reading “📘 Method postfix operator . in Perl 6”

📘 Prefix operator ~ in Perl 6

~ casts an object to a string. Note that we are now talking about the prefix or a unary operator. If the tilde is used as an infix (see later in this chapter about what infixes are), it works as a string concatenating operator, but it still deals with strings. my Str $a = ~42; … Continue reading “📘 Prefix operator ~ in Perl 6”

📘 Prefix operator | in Perl 6

| flattens the compound objects into a list. For example, this operator should be used when you pass a list to a subroutine, which expects a list of scalars: sub sum($a, $b) {     $a + $b }  my @data = (10, 20); say sum(|@data); # 30 Without the | operator, the compiler will report … Continue reading “📘 Prefix operator | in Perl 6”

📘 Prefix operator let in Perl 6

let is a prefix operator, which is similar to temp, but works correctly with exceptions. The previous value of the variable will be restored if the scope was left because of the exception. my $var = ‘a’; try {     let $var = ‘b’;     die; } say $var; # a With a die, this … Continue reading “📘 Prefix operator let in Perl 6”

📘 Postfix operator - - in Perl 6

- - is a postfix decrement. Both postfix and prefix operators magically know how to deal with numbers in filenames. my $filename = ‘file01.txt’; for 1..10 {     say $filename++; } This example prints the list of the filenames with incrementing numbers: file01.txt, file02.txt, … file10.txt.