The Pearls of Raku, Issue 13: functional elements and recursive sum

In this issue, we’ll take a look at an interesting pattern of passing multiple arguments to a function and apply it to creating a recursive sum.

In this issue, we’ll take a look at an interesting pattern of passing multiple arguments to a function and apply it to creating a recursive sum.

The Pearls of Raku, Issue 12: all and any

In this issue we’ll briefly talk about practical cases where junctions are really handy — both in syntax and in making the program simpler. Examples of using all and any junctions, checking parameters of MAIN, using in subsets.

In this issue we’ll briefly talk about practical cases where junctions are really handy — both in syntax and in making the program simpler. Examples of using all and any junctions, checking parameters of MAIN, using in subsets.

The Pearls of Raku, Issue 11: wrapping things

In this issue, we’ll talk about the built-in wrap routine and its possible applications: wrapping a function, measuring execution time, and logging.

In this issue, we’ll talk about the built-in wrap routine and its possible applications: wrapping a function, measuring execution time, and logging.

The Pearls of Raku, Issue 10: the -rw things

In this issue, we’ll discuss three elements in the Raku programming language that have the -rw suffix: substr-rw, return-rw, and take-rw.

In this issue, we’ll discuss three elements in the Raku programming language that have the -rw suffix: substr-rw, return-rw, and take-rw.

Raku Challenge Week 4, Task 1: Printing π

Let me return to the old challenges from last year and fill a few more gaps. The task for now is to write a program to output the same number of π digits as the size of the program.

Let me return to the old challenges from last year and fill a few more gaps. The task for now is to write a program to output the same number of π digits as the size of the program.

The weekly challenge 078: Leader element and Left rotation

This week, The Weekly Challenge offered us a couple of simple tasks, so why not solve it on Monday. Task1: Leader Element. Task 2: Left Rotation.

This week, The Weekly Challenge offered us a couple of simple tasks, so why not solve it on Monday. Task1: Leader Element. Task 2: Left Rotation.

Programming with passion

This week, I wrote a few programs solving the task of this week’s Weekly Challenge. I already explained the solution in the Raku programming language. In this post, I’d like to demonstrate other solutions. The key point is that they not only use different programming language but also approach the problem differently and implement different algorithms.

This week, I wrote a few programs solving the task of this week’s Weekly Challenge. I already explained the solution in the Raku programming language. In this post, I’d like to demonstrate other solutions. The key point is that they not only use different programming language but also approach the problem differently and implement different algorithms.

Lonely X — The Weekly Challenge 77, Task 2

The second task of this week’s challenge sounds like this:

You are given m x n character matrix consists of O and X only. Write a script to count the total number of X surrounded by O only. Print 0 if none found.

The second task of this week’s challenge sounds like this:

You are given m x n character matrix consists of O and X only. Write a script to count the total number of X surrounded by O only. Print 0 if none found.

Add up Fibonacci numbers — The Weekly Challenge 77, Task 1

The task today is: You are given a positive integer $N. Write a script to find out all possible combination of Fibonacci Numbers required to get $N on addition. You are NOT allowed to repeat a number. Print 0 if none found.

The task today is: You are given a positive integer $N. Write a script to find out all possible combination of Fibonacci Numbers required to get $N on addition. You are NOT allowed to repeat a number. Print 0 if none found.

The Story of Saving Amsterdam

In 2014, my business partner and a close friend Kirill and I launched one of the first escape room in Amsterdam. During the next five years, we built and opened two more escape room, hired a number of people, and then sold the business. Before the details disappear from our memories, I want to write … Continue reading “The Story of Saving Amsterdam”

A more idiomatic Raku solution

A couple of days ago I published a straightforward solution to the Task 2 of Week 75 of The Weekly Challenge. Despite that solution perfectly works, I wasn’t satisfied with it and wanted a more Raku-ish code. Here is the next iteration of it. my @hist = 3, 2, 3, 5, 7, 5; my $max … Continue reading “A more idiomatic Raku solution”

Largest Rectangle Histogram: The Raku Challenge Week 75, task 2

Hello, here is my solution to the Task 2 of Week 75 of the Weekly Challenge solved in the Raku programming language.

You are given an array of positive numbers @A. Write a script to find the largest rectangle histogram created by the given array.

Hello, here is my solution to the Task 2 of Week 75 of the Weekly Challenge solved in the Raku programming language.

You are given an array of positive numbers @A. Write a script to find the largest rectangle histogram created by the given array.

Coins Sum: The Raku Challenge Week 75, task 1

Here is my solution to the Task 1 of the Week 75 of the Weekly Challenge solved in the Raku programming language.

You are given a set of coins @C, assuming you have infinite amount of each coin in the set. Write a script to find how many ways you make sum $S using the coins from the set @C.

Here is my solution to the Task 1 of the Week 75 of the Weekly Challenge solved in the Raku programming language.

You are given a set of coins @C, assuming you have infinite amount of each coin in the set. Write a script to find how many ways you make sum $S using the coins from the set @C.

The Pearls of Raku, Issue 9: toss a coin; topic vs temporary variables

In this issue of the series, we are talking about two topics. The first is how to toss a coin using Raku. The second is how to avoid duplicated computations by setting the topic.

In this issue of the series, we are talking about two topics. The first is how to toss a coin using Raku. The second is how to avoid duplicated computations by setting the topic.

The Pearls of Raku, Issue 8: the secrets of min (and max)

In this issue, we’ll be focusing on the built-in min function. Occasionally also on max, but the whole story is well applicable to both of them. Some of the elements can also be used with other functions.

In this issue, we’ll be focusing on the built-in min function. Occasionally also on max, but the whole story is well applicable to both of them. Some of the elements can also be used with other functions.

The Pearls of Raku, Issue 7: Triangular reduction metaoperator

Welcome to the next issue of the series about the cool practical stuff in the Raku programming language. Today, we will discuss the usage of the so-called triangular reduction metaoperator on the following examples: [\*] and [\,].

Welcome to the next issue of the series about the cool practical stuff in the Raku programming language. Today, we will discuss the usage of the so-called triangular reduction metaoperator on the following examples: [\*] and [\,].

The weekly challenge nr 74

The Perl Weekly Challenge was renamed to The Weekly Challenge recently, so there’s a bigger chance that more solutions in other programming languages appear there.

In the two Raku solutions in this post, you can see how you can use the built-in Bag data type.
Task 1. Majority Element (Raku and C++ solutions). Task 2. First Non-Repeating Character (Raku solution).

The Perl Weekly Challenge was renamed to The Weekly Challenge recently, so there’s a bigger chance that more solutions in other programming languages appear there.

In the two Raku solutions in this post, you can see how you can use the built-in Bag data type.
Task 1. Majority Element (Raku and C++ solutions). Task 2. First Non-Repeating Character (Raku solution).

The Pearls of Raku, Issue 6: MAIN and BEGIN

Another set of tiny but useful practical things that can help your coding practice in the Raku programming language. In this issue, we are talking about the MAIN function and the BEGIN phaser.

Another set of tiny but useful practical things that can help your coding practice in the Raku programming language. In this issue, we are talking about the MAIN function and the BEGIN phaser.