The Pearls of Raku, Issue 3: tr, TR, and StrDistance

How do tr, TR string replacements work in Raku. What is a StrDistance type? What happens when you print such objects with ‘put’ and ‘say’?

How do tr, TR string replacements work in Raku. What is a StrDistance type? What happens when you print such objects with ‘put’ and ‘say’?

🎥 The Pearls of Raku, Issue 2

The Pearls of Raku for your pleasure! The “with” statement, and setting a topic when working with regexes. Also a video with a full review of the Raku solutions 069-2.

The Pearls of Raku for your pleasure! The “with” statement, and setting a topic when working with regexes. Also a video with a full review of the Raku solutions 069-2.

🎥 The Pearls of Raku, Issue 1

Let me demonstrate a few interesting things that I found by looking at the Raku solutions of last week’s Perl Weekly Challenge 1. All of them are notable as they reflect how differently people think, how unexpectedly they approach the same problems, and how big Raku is. So big that you forget or never meet some of its corners. In this issue: method operatos, $*USAGE, and :skip-empty.

Let me demonstrate a few interesting things that I found by looking at the Raku solutions of last week’s Perl Weekly Challenge 1. All of them are notable as they reflect how differently people think, how unexpectedly they approach the same problems, and how big Raku is. So big that you forget or never meet some of its corners. In this issue: method operatos, $*USAGE, and :skip-empty.

Raku challenge Week 70, issue 1

Here is a program in Raku to solve the task 1 of the weekly challenge. An interesting thing here is a reminder of how you swap the two elements of an array.

Here is a program in Raku to solve the task 1 of the weekly challenge. An interesting thing here is a reminder of how you swap the two elements of an array.

Gray code in Raku

Let us create a one-liner to generate the sequence of the so-called Gray code in the Raku programming language. This code is essentially a method of binary coding so that for each of the following integer number, you only change a single bit.

Let us create a one-liner to generate the sequence of the so-called Gray code in the Raku programming language. This code is essentially a method of binary coding so that for each of the following integer number, you only change a single bit.

The Lost Record: Larry Wall’s Perl 6 (Raku) announcement back in 2015 at FOSDEM

In February 2015, Larry Wall gave a keynote talk at the annual FOSDEM conference in Brussels. That was a talk of historical importance. And that was a talk, whose recording was never published. Fortunately, I have an audio recoding, which I am publishing now on YouTube. This seems to be the only existing recoding today.

In February 2015, Larry Wall gave a keynote talk at the annual FOSDEM conference in Brussels. That was a talk of historical importance. And that was a talk, whose recording was never published. Fortunately, I have an audio recoding, which I am publishing now on YouTube. This seems to be the only existing recoding today.

Finding stepping numbers in Raku

Here is a possible solution of the Task 1 of Week 52 of the Perl Weekly Challenge in the Raku programming language.

Find all stepping numbers between 100 and 999. A number is called a stepping number if the adjacent digits have a difference of 1.

Here is a possible solution of the Task 1 of Week 52 of the Perl Weekly Challenge in the Raku programming language.

Find all stepping numbers between 100 and 999. A number is called a stepping number if the adjacent digits have a difference of 1.

Wave arrays, a solution in Raku

For the given array of integers, rearrange the items so that the shape of the resulting array resembles the wave, that is, the second item is less or equals than the first one, the third item is bigger or equals to the second, then again a smaller number, then a bigger, and so on.

For the given array of integers, rearrange the items so that the shape of the resulting array resembles the wave, that is, the second item is less or equals than the first one, the third item is bigger or equals to the second, then again a smaller number, then a bigger, and so on.

A few more Raku challenges

1) From the given digits L, combine all possible numbers that are less than Y and that contain exactly X digits. 2) Write a function that from the given string returns the last word that matches the given regex.

1) From the given digits L, combine all possible numbers that are less than Y and that contain exactly X digits. 2) Write a function that from the given string returns the last word that matches the given regex.

Division by zero in Raku

Division by zero in Raku is one of my favourite topics. Let me demonstrate a couple of approaches that can be used in solving Task 1 of the Perl Weekly Challenge 31.

The task is to write a function that checks the division by zero without explicitly comparing the denominator with zero.

Division by zero in Raku is one of my favourite topics. Let me demonstrate a couple of approaches that can be used in solving Task 1 of the Perl Weekly Challenge 31.

The task is to write a function that checks the division by zero without explicitly comparing the denominator with zero.