The Pearls of Raku, Issue 13: functional elements and recursive sum

In this issue, we’ll take a look at an interesting pattern of passing multiple arguments to a function and apply it to creating a recursive sum.

In this issue, we’ll take a look at an interesting pattern of passing multiple arguments to a function and apply it to creating a recursive sum.

The Pearls of Raku, Issue 12: all and any

In this issue we’ll briefly talk about practical cases where junctions are really handy — both in syntax and in making the program simpler. Examples of using all and any junctions, checking parameters of MAIN, using in subsets.

In this issue we’ll briefly talk about practical cases where junctions are really handy — both in syntax and in making the program simpler. Examples of using all and any junctions, checking parameters of MAIN, using in subsets.

The Pearls of Raku, Issue 11: wrapping things

In this issue, we’ll talk about the built-in wrap routine and its possible applications: wrapping a function, measuring execution time, and logging.

In this issue, we’ll talk about the built-in wrap routine and its possible applications: wrapping a function, measuring execution time, and logging.

The Pearls of Raku, Issue 10: the -rw things

In this issue, we’ll discuss three elements in the Raku programming language that have the -rw suffix: substr-rw, return-rw, and take-rw.

In this issue, we’ll discuss three elements in the Raku programming language that have the -rw suffix: substr-rw, return-rw, and take-rw.

The Pearls of Raku, Issue 9: toss a coin; topic vs temporary variables

In this issue of the series, we are talking about two topics. The first is how to toss a coin using Raku. The second is how to avoid duplicated computations by setting the topic.

In this issue of the series, we are talking about two topics. The first is how to toss a coin using Raku. The second is how to avoid duplicated computations by setting the topic.

The Pearls of Raku, Issue 8: the secrets of min (and max)

In this issue, we’ll be focusing on the built-in min function. Occasionally also on max, but the whole story is well applicable to both of them. Some of the elements can also be used with other functions.

In this issue, we’ll be focusing on the built-in min function. Occasionally also on max, but the whole story is well applicable to both of them. Some of the elements can also be used with other functions.

The Pearls of Raku, Issue 7: Triangular reduction metaoperator

Welcome to the next issue of the series about the cool practical stuff in the Raku programming language. Today, we will discuss the usage of the so-called triangular reduction metaoperator on the following examples: [\*] and [\,].

Welcome to the next issue of the series about the cool practical stuff in the Raku programming language. Today, we will discuss the usage of the so-called triangular reduction metaoperator on the following examples: [\*] and [\,].

The Pearls of Raku, Issue 6: MAIN and BEGIN

Another set of tiny but useful practical things that can help your coding practice in the Raku programming language. In this issue, we are talking about the MAIN function and the BEGIN phaser.

Another set of tiny but useful practical things that can help your coding practice in the Raku programming language. In this issue, we are talking about the MAIN function and the BEGIN phaser.

The Pearls of Raku, Issue 5: the where clause

In this issue, I will be looking at the three use cases with the where clause. All the examples refer to the MAIN function, but the content is applicable to any other function.

In this issue, I will be looking at the three use cases with the where clause. All the examples refer to the MAIN function, but the content is applicable to any other function.

The Pearls of Raku, Issue 4: unit sub MAIN and command line, round and precision

Welcome to the next issues if The Pearls of Raku! Today, some interesting findings that I discovered while reviewing the previous weeks of The Perl Weekly Challenge and today when I added a new graph to The Coronavirus Observer.

Welcome to the next issues if The Pearls of Raku! Today, some interesting findings that I discovered while reviewing the previous weeks of The Perl Weekly Challenge and today when I added a new graph to The Coronavirus Observer.

The Pearls of Raku, Issue 3: tr, TR, and StrDistance

How do tr, TR string replacements work in Raku. What is a StrDistance type? What happens when you print such objects with ‘put’ and ‘say’?

How do tr, TR string replacements work in Raku. What is a StrDistance type? What happens when you print such objects with ‘put’ and ‘say’?

🎥 The Pearls of Raku, Issue 2

The Pearls of Raku for your pleasure! The “with” statement, and setting a topic when working with regexes. Also a video with a full review of the Raku solutions 069-2.

The Pearls of Raku for your pleasure! The “with” statement, and setting a topic when working with regexes. Also a video with a full review of the Raku solutions 069-2.

🎥 The Pearls of Raku, Issue 1

Let me demonstrate a few interesting things that I found by looking at the Raku solutions of last week’s Perl Weekly Challenge 1. All of them are notable as they reflect how differently people think, how unexpectedly they approach the same problems, and how big Raku is. So big that you forget or never meet some of its corners. In this issue: method operatos, $*USAGE, and :skip-empty.

Let me demonstrate a few interesting things that I found by looking at the Raku solutions of last week’s Perl Weekly Challenge 1. All of them are notable as they reflect how differently people think, how unexpectedly they approach the same problems, and how big Raku is. So big that you forget or never meet some of its corners. In this issue: method operatos, $*USAGE, and :skip-empty.